Overview

An estimated 20% of young children struggle with learning to read (Bassok et al., 2017; West et al., 2001), and parents are eager to help their children. In a nationally representative survey of parents (Silander et al., 2018), 99% of parents, regardless of income or education, think it’s important to help their child learn to read at home. In addition, 76% of parents reported that they and the school are equally responsible for helping their child learn to read.

Parents of struggling readers report that to remediate their child’s reading difficulty, they often must access reading instruction outside of the school system (Silander et al., 2018), an option that is inaccessible to many families who cannot afford private tutors. For these families in particular, there should be another high-quality, affordable option. Parents of young struggling readers are willing to work with their children (Spurlock, 2017) and report that they need lessons that are (a) short, (b) fun, (c) easy to implement, (d) self-contained so that materials are in one place, and (e) affordable (Petty, 2021; Tidwell, 2021).

Researchers will work closely with a cadre of parents whose first-graders struggle with reading to develop a set of at-home reading lessons. After development, a pilot study in collaboration with area elementary schools will investigate initial efficacy. Check back in the summer of 2022 to download the lessons, free of charge.

Join Us

If you are a parent of a struggling reader and would like to join our work group, contact Dr. Elizabeth Swanson.

Contact Information

Elizabeth Swanson
Principal Investigator
easwanson@austin.utexas.edu

Funding Agency

Timeline

  • January 2022 to August 2023