Autism Spectrum Disorders Institute


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Greg Allen

Dr. Greg Allen received his doctorate from the Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at San Diego State University and The University of California, San Diego, which The Chronicle of Higher Education recently ranked as the top clinical psychology doctoral program in the country. Allen completed a predoctoral internship in clinical neuropsychology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center and a postdoctoral residency in clinical neuropsychology at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Following residency, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UT Southwestern before joining the faculty at UT Austin. As a licensed psychologist specializing in neuropsychological assessment, he has received specialized training and certification in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders. His research uses neuropsychological and neuroimaging tools to study the brain basis of autism. The current focus of this work is the investigation of cerebellar function and the contribution of cerebellar dysfunction to the behaviors and symptoms of autism. To contact Allen, visit the UT Austin Department of Educational Psychology website.


Photo of Tonya Davis

Tonya Davis

Dr. Tonya Davis is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at Baylor University. Davis earned her doctorate in special education with a specialization in autism and developmental disabilities from The University of Texas at Austin. She is a board-certified behavior analyst – doctoral level (BCBA-D). Her research interests include the assessment and treatment of challenging behaviors and communication intervention among individuals with developmental disabilities. She has more than 10 years of experience working with individuals with developmental disabilities and their families as a researcher, special education teacher, and BCBA-D. To contact Davis, visit the Baylor University website.


Photo of Terry S. Falcomata

Terry S. Falcomata

Dr. Terry S. Falcomata is an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Program. Falcomata earned his doctorate from the University of Iowa. His research emphasis is in applied behavior analysis and the application of its technologies in the home and school, primarily in the assessment and treatment of severe destructive behavior displayed by individuals with developmental disabilities and autism. This research has focused on the use of functional analysis methods and functional communication training in the assessment and treatment of destructive behaviors. His specific areas of interest currently include the generalization of effective treatments, the emergence of vocal communication during communication training, and the variables affecting the resurgence of destructive behavior following treatment. His other research interests include factors influencing choice (e.g., self-control, impulsivity), such as the role of dimensions of reinforcement and the application of stimulus equivalence methods for teaching skills to children with autism and other developmental disabilities. To contact Falcomata, visit the UT Austin Department of Special Education website.


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Russell Lang

Dr. Russell Lang is an assistant professor of special education at Texas State University–San Marcos and a BCBA-D. Lang earned a doctorate degree in special education with an emphasis in applied behavior analysis and early childhood developmental disabilities from The University of Texas at Austin. He completed his postdoctoral research at the University of California in Santa Barbara. He has published more than 50 peer-reviewed research papers and multiple book chapters concerning the education and treatment of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. His primary research interest is the treatment of problematic and challenging behaviors in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. His research is most often conducted in applied settings, including children’s homes and schools. He serves on the editorial review boards for Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Developmental Neurorehabilitation. To contact Lang, visit the Texas State website.


Photo of Ann Levine

Ann Levine

Dr. Ann Levine is a neuropsychologist wiht a Psy.D. from the University of Denver. Levine completed her fellowship in autism at the School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina and completed a fellowship in pediatric neuropsychology at the New England Medical Center at Tufts University School of Medicine. She first worked with children with autism spectrum disorders and their families at the Yale Child Study Center. Since then, she has worked in psychiatric inpatient facilities, academic medical centers, managed care organizations, and in both public and private schools, helping medically fragile children and those with psychiatric difficulties, learning difficulties, and developmental disabilities. Prior to joining the faculty at the Texas Child Study Center, she was a supervising neuropsychologist at the University of Washington’s Autism Center. She specializes in early identification of children with autism, using parent- and child-focused interventions to help young autistic children expand their skills and to decrease anxiety and depression in adolescents. To contact Levine, visit the Dell Children's Medical Center website.


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Amanda Little

Dr. Amanda Little is an assistant professor in the area of early childhood in the Department of Special Education. Little received her doctorate from the University of Kansas and master of education with an emphasis in early childhood and autism from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She is a BCBA-D and has many years of experience working with young children who engage in challenging behavior and their families. Her research interests include using applied behavior analysis, positive behavior supports, and intervention strategies that support children and families in the contexts of home, school, and the community. To contact Little, visit the UT Austin Department of Special Education website.


Photo of Mandy Rispoli

Mandy Rispoli

Dr. Mandy Rispoli is an assistant professor of special education at Texas A&M University and a BCBA-D. Rispoli earned her doctorate in special education with a concentration in autism and developmental disabilities from The University of Texas at Austin. She has published more than 47 peer-reviewed research articles and two book chapters concerning the education of children with autism and developmental disabilities. Her primary research focus pertains to function-based antecedent interventions for challenging behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders. Her work in this area explores the role of variables that may alter a child’s motivation to engage in challenging behaviors during behavioral assessments and interventions. She serves on the editorial review board for Assessment for Effective Intervention. To contact Rispoli, visit the Texas A&M website.


Photo of Nina Zuna

Nina Zuna

Dr. Nina Zuna is an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education in the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Program. Zuna earned her master’s in special education with an emphasis in low-incidence disabilities from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and her doctorate in special education with an emphasis in families and disability policy from the University of Kansas at Lawrence. She has more than 10 years of experience working with children with disabilities and their families as a researcher, certified special education teacher, and in-home and in-school behavioral skills therapist. Her research interests include family quality of life, family supports and services, social/emotional development in children with autism, and social skills interventions. To contact Zuna, visit the UT Austin Department of Special Education website.





Photo of Katherine Ledbetter-Cho

Katherine Ledbetter-Cho

Katherine Ledbetter-Cho is a doctoral student in special education with a concentration in autism and developmental disabilities at The University of Texas. Ledbetter-Cho holds a bachelor of science degree in special education from the University of Georgia and a master of science degree in autism and applied behavior analysis from Texas State University. Her primary research interests include parent training and interventions designed to improve the communication and play skills of children with autism.


Photo of Laura Rojeski

Laura Rojeski

Dr. Laura Rojeski has a doctorate in autism and developmental disabilities from The University of Texas at Austin. Rojeski earned her bachelor of arts in psychology and her master of education in special education with a focus on autism and developmental disabilities. She is a board-certified behavior analyst with 6 years of experience working with children with autism and other disabilities both in the home and in clinic settings. She has experience as a direct therapist and as a supervisor, training and supervising master's-level students and overseeing program implementation. Her research interests center on motivating operations and expanding the research in this area to include applied approaches to motivating operation interventions.